Are you amplifying your earned media success?

Todays’ post is by Hollie Geitner, Vice President of Client Services for WordWrite Communications of Pittsburgh, a fellow member firm of PR Boutiques International.

If you’ve been quoted in a positive news article about your industry, or your byline was recently published by a trade magazine, congratulations! You’re now a thought leader. This is a designation many aspire to, which is why it’s important you take the care and time to leverage that incredible placement as part of your overall marketing strategy.

The blurred lines between news media and digital channels mean that more and more people, including business leaders, utilize information they find on social media to influence their business purchasing decisions. And, despite the publicized erosion of confidence in the news media, the Cision 2017 State of the Media Report indicates that most audiences view a news story as more reputable and trustworthy than a company’s branded marketing materials.

So, if you have a great story, share it! Here are some ideas for leveraging your earned media hit: 

  1. Post it to your personal and company social channels and link to the publication or media outlet. 
  2. Share it with your internal team—including sales representatives. Encourage them to use the story when meeting with clients or prospects or share on their own channels. 
  3. Put some money behind a social post to receive more click-throughs. Facebook ads allow you to target your demographic so your content is seen by those most interested in your industry. 
  4. Publish a post on your LinkedIn page. The publishing platform is very user friendly. Spend a little time writing a post about your expertise and mention the publication that originally included you or your company. This is a good way to get more detailed than perhaps what was in the article. And, once you publish it on LinkedIn you’ll see how many people view, share or engage with your post.
  5. Mention the story in your customer newsletter and in communications to Board members and other stakeholders. 

Just like you would with your marketing efforts, have a plan in place to track the post metrics, such as likes, shares and engagement. Google Analytics, social platform dashboards and even paid services such as Trendkite make it simple to pull it all together so you can easily see the impact one great story can have on your company.

Remember, don’t toss that great media hit aside. Amplify it!

 

Share

Planning to Advertise? Four Things to Keep in Mind

Many potential clients approach a public relations firm seeking earned media coverage (aka “free publicity”) to promote their product or service.  Depending on the client, their target market and goals, a PR firm may recommend including advertising in the marketing mix to achieve maximum effectiveness.

We believe having a professionally planned ad campaign is the best way to proceed, but if you decide to do it on your own, here are a few guidelines to keep in mind.

  • Who do you want to reach?  Answering this question will help determine where you advertise and your advertising message.  You want to think of where your potential customers get their information and why they may need your product or service.
  • Have a consistent image and message that will appeal to your target market.  You can have ads that address different topics, but the look of your ad and the basic message about your company should remain consistent so that your ad is instantly recognizable as being from your company.
  • Once is not enough.  Repetition is essential to get through the information clutter, so you will have to set aside a decent advertising budget to get the results you want.
  • Monitor your campaign’s effectiveness.  The simplest way to do this is to regularly ask where any new contact heard about you.

Posted by Margot Dimond

Share

Four Common Misconceptions about PR

The year is still young, and you may not have decided what to do to improve your company’s marketing for the coming year. You think PR may be the answer, and no doubt you would benefit from it.  But it’s a good idea to know what you want to accomplish with public relations – one of the most misunderstood of business functions.

Before you call a firm or hire a PR specialist, let’s dispel some common misconceptions about the practice.

  1. PR is about writing and sending news releases.  Think of a news release as the bread and butter that accompanies the meal.  It’s not the whole meal or even the main course.  Every business or nonprofit organization needs to begin any public relations program with a strategic plan – one that incorporates their overall goal, short-term objectives, target audiences, strategy, tactics and how success will be measured.  A news release is one of many tactics that may be used in carrying out the plan.
  2. PR is “free advertising.”  First of all, public relations and advertising messages are entirely different.  You can overtly promote your organization in an ad, while to obtain “earned” media coverage (coverage you don’t have to pay for), you must have a story – one that makes a worthwhile contribution to the editorial content of a media outlet.  Second, public relations work is not free; whether you are using in-house staff or an outside firm, you will pay for the time and talent that it takes to get recognition for your business.
  3. When interviewing a PR specialist, the first thing to ask is how our business would be promoted.   Every business or nonprofit organization is unique in some way, and no one PR plan will be right for each one. Ask that question of a PR firm, and you will probably get a series of questions in return or a request to meet and talk with you in person.  That’s because the answer to your question depends on all of the factors that will go into your company’s strategic PR plan (see #1, above).
  4. We need good PR to quickly counteract recent bad publicity.  Hiring a PR firm to put a positive spin on bad acts by your company is pretty much useless.  The truth has a way of coming out, and in today’s media climate it can be devastating to your business, as online and social media can reach millions of people before you can do anything about it.  The best way – perhaps the only way – to counter negative media coverage is to apologize immediately for any wrongdoing and begin a long-term program to repair the damage to your reputation.  And that PR program has to be based on good acts, or it won’t succeed.

Posted by Margot Dimond

Share

Trade Show Success Starts with the Right Strategy

Trade Shows are a major part of marketing for many businesses, but generating solid leads requires a plan.  Guest blogger, Wendy Marx of Marx Communications, shows how the right strategy can make all the difference.

Sadly, getting leads is no slam dunk and not every lead you get is a hot one. You need to have the right audience, right message, right time — and the right strategy.

When it comes to trade shows, you might think that generating B2B leads is a piece of cake. After all, you’re under one roof, engaging with those who have an active interest in your industry, often for multiple days.

And, although LinkedIn is responsible for generating as many as 80% of all B2B leads, trade shows are still a successful staple of any B2B marketing strategy.

77% of marketers say trade shows generate a significant quantity of leads. ~ Tom Pick of Meltwater

So how can you make the most of your trade show experience?

5 WAYS TO GENERATE B2B LEADS AT TRADE SHOWS

1.  Contact the Right People Weeks Before.  Typically, a trade show will release a list of press members who are covering the show. This may include bloggers, influencers, and journalists.

While these contacts are not themselves leads, their audience is. One of the most important steps you can take to snag time with these influential people is to reach out to them by email at least several weeks before a show. Request that they stop by your booth, and if possible, schedule a time for them to do so. Remember that media get jammed at trade shows so you want to be early enough for them to see you. If they are overscheduled or not attending the conference, not to worry. Offer them the opportunity to interview you in advance and embargo the interview till the show.

If you can, give them samples, a free trial, or a demo of your product or service.  And don’t forget to provide background information or any helpful collateral.

2.  Land a Speaking Engagement.  Securing a speaking gig is a great way to generate more credibility around your brand, as well as yourself as a thought leader.

This isn’t always easy to do, so you must plan well in advance. Thought leadership begins with your owned media. In addition, once you have established credibility, you will have to submit an application to speak, likely months in advance. Here’s one tip to help get you in the door: Submit if you can with a customer. Trade shows are loaded with vendors eager to speak and you can differentiate yourself by presenting with a customer.

Landing a speaking engagement at a trade show is well worth the effort, as it will drive prospects, not only to your booth, but to your website since you will (with any luck) create a memorable presence.

3.  Establish Your Goals.  Of course, the end game is always to turn strangers into buyers. However, the stage you’re at in your marketing game will largely determine your goals and means of achieving them.

If you’re a startup, you’re main mission at a trade show might be to create a buzz by handing out free swag. However, if you’re well-established, you might be aiming to launch a new product, or secure greater publicity.

Get your strategy in place by first determining your end game.

4.  Get Busy on Social Media.  In the weeks and days that precede a trade event, you’ll want to create a buzz on social media. If your brand is launching a new product at a trade show, why not use Snapchat to reveal a hint of the product, mentioning that the full product will be unleashed at the upcoming trade show.

While you’re at the trade show, take full advantage of Facebook Live to capture real-time highlights of the event.

5.  Follow Up.  Want to know something a bit frightening? One statistic says:

“90% of trade show attendees received no follow-up within 12 months of their visit.” ~ Danny Zecevic of Skura

If you want anything to come of your trade show experience, you must follow up. That means inputting new contacts into your CRM, reaching out via email or telephone, and asking for permission to add them to your email list.

Just think… if you can accomplish this one task that so few B2B companies are paying attention to, you’ll have the upper hand to win your prospects’ attention.

Ready to go conquer your next trade show? Just remember…

  • Make contact with the press well before the show.
  • Land a speaking engagement.
  • Create and work within your trade show marketing strategy.
  • Publicize your presence at the event on social media.
  • Always follow up with the contacts you made at the show. 

Wendy Marx is president of Marx Communications, which is based in Connecticut.

Share

Consider paid content as part of your marketing mix

It’s long been known that people love stories that touch their hearts or relate to their experience in some way.  And PR people are good at story-telling.  We’ve been doing it for years – identifying interesting stories relating to our clients’ businesses or organizations for the news media to feature.

Enter content marketing, which provides an opportunity to attract your target audience with story-telling that specifically addresses their needs and desires.  The use of content marketing in public relations is not new; what is somewhat new, however, is the use of a combination of organic (non-paid) and paid content by marketers on their preferred social media platforms.

While paid content is unlikely to take the place of traditional advertising, it is often less expensive and has the benefit of offering some useful information in the form of an article or video, which enhances its credibility.  That makes it a good addition to the overall PR/marketing mix.

Whether paid or organic, here are some essentials to attracting the right audience to your content:

  • Make it Compelling: Your content has to be something that your audience wants to read.  That requires a strong narrative and more focus on their needs and desires and less on your product or service.
  • Target with the Right Platform: Do some research to find the preferred sites for your audience. For starters, Facebook is the top choice for reaching consumers; LinkedIn is better for B2B marketing.
  • Think Video: Attention spans get shorter every year (currently estimated at 8 seconds by a recent Microsoft study), and research shows that nearly 60% of B2B audiences prefer watching video over reading text.
  • Include a “Call to Action”: Free samples, discounts, coupons, etc., are not just ways to get people to try your product or service; they can be an indicator of the effectiveness of your message since they measure audience interest.

Posted by Margot Dimond

Share

Expect the Unexpected: Three Essentials for Communicating During a Crisis

Would you be ready if a crisis occurred at your company?  It wouldn’t have to be a major occurrence – just any unexpected event that disrupts your business.  Are you prepared?

Crisis planning has become a necessity in our digital world, where even small incidents can go viral, shattering company reputations virtually overnight.  But a crisis plan is incomplete without a communications component. When a company is in the middle of a crisis, communication often takes a back seat to action, and that can do as much – or more – damage as the crisis itself.

We have written previously on crisis communications planning.  Here are three essentials for communicating during a crisis:

  1. Don’t delay in communicating the problem. It’s the response – or more likely, the lack of response – to a crisis that causes the situation to escalate into an even bigger problem.  Any delay in responding, or even a tepid response, can add fuel to the fire.
  2. Show concern for those affected. It’s important to show concern for those affected – whether they are employees, customers, or the community.  To quote former President Theodore Roosevelt, “Nobody cares how much you know until they know how much you care.”
  3. Be honest about the extent of the crisis. When a crisis occurs, you may not have all the facts at your disposal right away.  However, depending on who is affected, you will have to make some kind of initial statement and updates as new information is available.  What’s most important is to be honest about the extent of any damage and what steps you are taking to address the crisis.

How you communicate during a crisis should be an integral part of your crisis planning – especially if your organization is high profile, operating or moving dangerous materials, or providing products or services directly to consumers.

Communicating well can make damage control much easier.

Posted by Margot Dimond.

 

Share

PR and the Rise of Digital News

Anyone who has observed the media for the past decade has seen a dramatic change in the way news is reported and disseminated.  For the most part, this is due to the rise of digital as the preferred way for Americans to get their news.

According to a recent study by the Pew Research Center, “digital is currently second only to TV news as the most prominent news platform.”

The study was published by Pew in an article on its website, “10 facts about the changing digital news landscape.”  Fact #5 stands out for PR practitioners:   “Social media, particularly Facebook, is now a common news source.”

How does this affect the practice of PR?

Advertising dollars are spent where most people will see the ads, and that is increasingly online.  Advertising pays the bills.  As more advertising money is spent online, many traditional newsrooms are cutting back on staff – not just at newspapers, but at radio and television stations as well.

What this means is that PR people can face stiff competition when attempting to get positive media attention for their clients through traditional media outlets.  That’s usually not a problem for experienced practitioners.  However, it’s important to consider that the audience they are trying to reach may be getting their news somewhere else.

This is basic strategic public relations:  analyze the client’s target audiences and where and how these audiences can most likely be reached.

Nowadays, that may be online.

Posted by Margot Dimond

Share

Questions Top PR Firms Ask Their Clients

At the first meeting with your new PR firm, you may find yourself answering a lot of questions.  In the following post, our guest blogger, Lucy Siegel of Bridge Global Strategies, says there are five crucial questions you should be asked – and why they are important.

PR firms offering the highest quality of service ask their clients a lot of questions.  That’s the only way they can understand the best approaches to meeting their clients’ PR goals.

This blog post will focus on some of the questions a PR firm should be asking a client.  First, though, I want to emphasize that no questions should be off limits on either side.  We ask our clients a ton of questions in order to do our jobs as well as possible, and we expect and encourage clients to ask us anything they want to know.

1. What’s the background and history of your company, your founders and your CEO?  Some clients don’t understand why this question is relevant, especially when the assignment involves public relations for a product and not corporate PR for a company.

“Just focus on the product; you don’t need to be concerned with the company’s background,” some clients will say.  But PR involves piecing together a compelling story about a product or service that will resonate with the company’s various audiences (potential customers, communities, employees, suppliers, etc.).  Sometimes the story about the company can enhance the product story.

2. What are your goals for PR?  This question should always be asked by agencies and is crucial for starting any PR program.  Your goals may be simply to raise visibility as a precursor to brand building and sales.  Or you may be looking for a way to increase sales leads directly, to position the company in a new market, or address negative impressions of your company or product.  Getting media coverage, increasing the number of likes and followers, increasing the number of shares of company blog posts and articles, etc., are not goals for PR; they’re a means toward reaching the goal.

3. What do you picture as an ideal outcome of the work we’ll do?  Your answers to this question reveal a lot to your agency.  Sometimes company executives have unrealistic expectations about what PR can accomplish.  It may be highly unlikely that the PR team can get your product written about by the Wall Street Journal or any other top-tier media.  This is an issue that should be discussed at the beginning of a client-agency relationship because it’s very important for you to have realistic expectations about what to expect.  Unfortunately, some agencies deliberately mislead potential clients about their ability to deliver that type of outcome.

There may also be a disconnect between the outcomes you’re looking for and the goals you’ve expressed, which a good agency will point out and discuss with you.

4. Who, what, when, where, why and how?  These are the basics to any story, and the elements that public relations depends on.  They’re the questions journalists and bloggers will ask the PR agency staff working on your account and the focus of content marketing, social media and search engine optimization.  For example, here’s a vital “what” question:

  • What makes your product or your company different from your competitors’ products? If you’re looking for media coverage from your PR team, this is a crucial question.  The media is geared to gathering and reporting news.  If there’s nothing much to differentiate your product or company from others, it will probably be very difficult to get interest from the media in covering your story.  Other methods of PR may be more effective in those circumstances than media relations.

Just as parents think their own child is special, companies are often too close to their own stories to be objective.  Sometimes what the company feels is unique is really not a big enough difference from the competition to qualify as a true differentiation from a news viewpoint.  Trust the feedback your PR agency gives you.  The agency is able to be a lot more objective than your company’s staff, who are living and breathing your business day in and day out.

If a PR agency knows there isn’t a lot to differentiate you from the competition, the agency team can focus on creating news.  This can be done in many ways, including establishing new and different corporate initiatives within your community or for your employees, developing new data through a company-sponsored survey, or developing a news-making company-sponsored event.

For more on the definition of news (something that’s hard for many people to grasp), you may be interested in the this post I wrote some time ago, which directly addresses what the media consider to be newsworthy and what they don’t.

To better understand the challenges of getting media coverage in today’s media environment, you may also be interested in this blog post:

Clients must be forthcoming and honest in answering these basic questions, even if some of the answers don’t put the company in the best light.  If the agency doesn’t know the truth, all of the truth, it puts the agency’s PR team in a very bad position to work effectively.  Journalists will probe for answers and do research on their own.   If they’re given dishonest answers to their questions, they’ll think less of the company the agency is representing, as well as the PR agency people.

Sometimes internal corporate staff feel that it’s better for the PR agency not to know negative information so they won’t be able to spread it around.  But knowing honest answers doesn’t mean the agency PR team will provide that negative information to the media unless the client and agency have agreed that’s the best approach.  Some questions don’t have to be answered directly.  When a company just provides a rosy picture of the company and/or products, and leaves the PR team in the dark about the actual situation, it’s a recipe for PR failure.  One reason why:  the best approach for answering difficult questions from the media is to plan ahead for those difficult questions to come up and how to answer them.  PR professionals are well-prepared to help with those questions and answers, but can’t be helpful unless they know the whole truth, both negatives and positives.

5. What’s your budget?  This is a question that every PR firm should ask before preparing a proposal for you, and one that you should answer honestly.  Many potential clients tell us, “we don’t know what the budget is – we want you to tell us what we need to spend.”  What’s wrong with that picture?  The size of the budget will determine how fast your goals can be reached, and a PR program can be tailored to cover different levels of work.  An agency is put in a difficult position when that question goes unanswered.  If the agency makes an assumption that the budget is more than what the company can actually afford, it’s a waste of the agency’s time.  If the agency guesses on the low side, the proposal may not include as much PR activity as the client needs to meet PR goals.  Frequently we’re told, “Just give us a few different budget levels to choose from.”  That entails a lot of work with no compensation, all of which is in vain if the company decides on another agency or chooses not to move ahead with PR at all.  While developing proposals is part of the cost of doing business, asking for multiple proposals for the same project isn’t fair to PR agencies.

The reason many companies don’t like to reveal their budgets is the fear that they will be taken advantage of.  It’s a common corporate assumption that the agencies bidding on PR work will spend the maximum, whether it’s necessary or not.  However, in asking about budget, most agencies simply want to have information that will help them decide the type and scope of PR program that will work best given your budget.

Some of the questions PR firms ask clients and potential clients can only be answered by top management.  That’s one reason why PR professionals (internal and external) need access to clients’ top management executives.

Every company wants a top PR firm, one that can deliver results.  However, PR Professionals need a lot of information to be successful.

###

Lucy Siegel is president and CEO of Bridge Global Strategies, based in New York City.

Share

Forming a Productive Relationship with Your PR Firm

Branding Brand Trademark Commercial Identity Marketing ConceptMost public relations firms that have been in business for a while have established relationships with long-term clients.  That’s no accident.  Lasting client/PR firm relationships are built on mutual trust and respect.  The client knows that the PR firm has its best interests at heart, will keep confidential information confidential, and can design and communicate strategic messages effectively.  The PR firm appreciates being part of the team – respected for its contribution to the organization.

How that relationship begins is the key to its success. Every PR firm has a responsibility upfront to explain their process for coming up with a strategy and implementing it, especially for a business or nonprofit organization that has never worked with a PR firm before.  Successful PR-client relationships begin with an understanding of what PR can do and how it can achieve the organization’s goals.

The client also has some responsibility for making the relationship a mutually beneficial one.  Here are three tips for clients who want to establish a positive, long-term relationship with their PR firm:

  • Let them show what they can do. Bring the PR firm in at the beginning of the relationship to inform them of your business goals so they can develop an effective communication strategy to achieve them. Expecting a PR firm to handle a series of communication tactics – news releases, brochures, ads – without allowing them to design the strategy behind them rarely works out well.  An outside PR counselor is trained to look for the “WIIFM” factor – the news significance or marketing message that you may not see as an insider.
  • Communicate. It may take some time to develop trust with a new PR firm, but if a firm has been in business for several years and has a good reputation and established long-term client relationships, that firm is probably trustworthy.  So share as much information as possible about your business, its successes and its failures. PR firms specialize in finding solutions to problems. Give them a chance to do so.
  • Be responsive. Too many great PR plans have been thrown off track by a client’s delayed response to a PR firm.  Timeliness in response to events, news, or a media interview request can mean the difference between gaining positive attention for your organization and missing out on a really great opportunity.

Posted by Margot Dimond.

Share

Five Steps to a Successful Speech

iStock_000012372602SmallDo you dread making a speech? If you do you have plenty of company.  Studies have shown that fear of public speaking, or Glossophobia, affects three out of four people.  In fact, it ranks as the number one fear, with number two being death – a finding that once prompted comedian Jerry Seinfeld to remark that the average person going to a funeral “would rather be in the casket than doing the eulogy.”

Today, digital communication is the norm, and while email, text and social media present their own special problems, they are a lot less daunting to the average person than presenting to a group.  The good news is there are some simple steps you can take to ease this fear and become an effective spokesperson for your business, whether your audience is one person or 1,000.

When planning your next presentation, keep these five elements in mind:

  1.  Work backwards. Don’t begin writing a presentation until you have determined what you want the end result to be.  What do you want to move your audience to do?  Is your purpose to inform or persuade, or both?  Identify key points you want your audience to take away, and make them easy to remember.
  2. Know your audience. How many people will be in attendance?  What kind of work do they do?  What is their level of understanding about your subject?  What do they want to hear – and what might upset them?
  3. Be understandable.   Regardless of the level of understanding of your audience, it’s always best to speak in conventional English and avoid technical jargon.  Use analogies, anecdotes and descriptive words to make your points.  Although the temptation is to rush through your presentation to get it over with, remember to take your time and keep your tone measured and friendly.
  4. Be yourself. Be honest, open and sincere.  Tell a story about yourself that relates to the content of your presentation.  Gesture naturally, and move around a bit, if possible, even if you stay close to the podium.
  5. Prepare, prepare, prepare.  None of the above will mean anything if you haven’t spent enough time preparing.  Relying too heavily on a PowerPoint presentation or notes during a speech can be deadly dull.  Instead, rehearse your speech until you can present it comfortably.  Have a friend, family member, or co-worker listen, time it and offer a critique.  Anticipate any audience questions or points they are likely to challenge.

Speaking well in public is a skill, and like any skill, the more you practice, the better you will be at it.  You may well find yourself looking forward to your next presentation!

Posted by Margot Dimond

Share