Defining Public Relations, Part Two: Planning for Success

Calendar planning conceptLet’s say you’ve hired a public relations firm, and you are about to have your first meeting.  Of course, the first thing you will want from the meeting is a list of everything they are planning to do for you in the next month, right?  Primarily, you will want to know who in the media they will be contacting about you and when they think they will have some results.

But you may want to step back and consider the following questions:

  1. Do I have a plan for the project or continuing service I have engaged this firm for?
  2. Do they have enough in-depth information about our company to pitch good, solid stories to the news media?

If the answer to each of these questions is “no,”  you really need to take the time during this first meeting to share as much information as possible and ask for a strategic PR plan before anything is done.  That way, you will know what success looks like for your particular PR program – and how to measure it.

Some things to consider during the planning phase.

  • What is my ultimate goal for this PR program?  What do you want to happen within the time-frame of the program?
  • Who is my target audience?  Who do you want to reach with your message?  There may be – and often is – more than one target audience.
  • What is my corporate message?  Your corporate message is what you want people to identify as the main thing your company does or your organization stands for.
  • What is our PR strategy?  A PR strategy is your “road map” for getting to where you want to be.
  • What are the tactics that will be used?  Tactics are the individual activities – marketing materials (brochures, website), media pitches, social media outreach, speaking opportunities, etc. – that are used to carry out your strategy.
  • What are the PR objectives?    These are the measurable benchmarks for you to gauge along the way whether or not your PR program is succeeding.
  • What is the timeline?  You should have a solid idea of what will be done and when, based on your input as well as the PR firm’s best estimates about when things can be accomplished.  Keep in mind that you, as the client, will need to be accessible for consultations and approvals all along the way to keep your timeline on track.  PR firms do not operate well in a vacuum, and most will not send anything out on your behalf without your prior approval.

You may feel that taking the time to plan will mean a serious delay in the implementation of your program.  Yes, there will be some delay, but it shouldn’t take more than a month to get everything on paper and ready to go.   Then you won’t be taking off on this new adventure without a road map.  You will have a really good idea of where you are going and how you will get there.

Next time:  Telling your story

Posted by Margot Dimond

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