Defining Public Relations, Part Three: Telling Your Story

iStock_000012372602SmallEffective public relations often involves telling a story, and every organization – whether a business or charity – has a story to tell.  How you tell your story can make all the difference.  It must be true, meaningful and memorable.

A good story engages its audience as no other means of communication can.  As Pamela Rutledge says in an article in Psychology Today,  “when organizations, causes, brands or individuals identify and develop a core story, they create and display authentic meaning and purpose that others can believe, participate with, and share” (“The Psychological Power of Storytelling,” 1/16/11).

Not everyone, however, is adept at telling their organization’s story for a variety of reasons.  Here are some things that may prevent you from telling your story effectively:

  • You are too close to the story to see it clearly.
  • You are so used to talking to other people within your organization, you may assume everyone knows what you know.
  • You use insider jargon that is essentially meaningless to the outside world.
  • Your business has been operating for so long, you have forgotten your story – or, worse, it has become somewhat stale.
  • You’ve become rigid about how your story should be told.

Your story should be about what makes your organization special, how it came to be, and why its work is important.   Here are some essential elements of your story:

Organization.  Every good story has a beginning, a middle, and an end.  The Beginning:  Talk about your background and how you saw some problem or area of service that you believed you had the answer to; The Middle: Explain how you decided to address the problem; and The End:  Talk about what your organization does now and why it is successful.  The computer industry is full of such stories:  think of Apple’s iconic founding by two guys in a garage, revolutionizing the computer industry.

Simplicity.  Your story does not need to be full of detail.  People who are interested in what you do will inquire about the details, and you can fill them in when they do.  Always have an “elevator” version – a brief synopsis when someone asks what you do at a conference, during a party, or, yes, from one floor to the next on an elevator.

Audience Friendly.  Your story should always be tailored to the audience you are addressing at the time.  For example, your presentation to the CEOs and managers of an industry should not be the same as a presentation to the people specializing in your particular profession.

Keep in mind that even if you tell your story in various ways to match your audience interests, the essential elements should remain consistent.  Repetition is the key to a company story becoming widely known.

Posted by Margot Dimond

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One thought on “Defining Public Relations, Part Three: Telling Your Story

  1. This blog series has been most helpful. I have a small business and appreciate your insight. I have been implementing your suggestions and have seen results.

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