Planning to Advertise? Four Things to Keep in Mind

Many potential clients approach a public relations firm seeking earned media coverage (aka “free publicity”) to promote their product or service.  Depending on the client, their target market and goals, a PR firm may recommend including advertising in the marketing mix to achieve maximum effectiveness.

We believe having a professionally planned ad campaign is the best way to proceed, but if you decide to do it on your own, here are a few guidelines to keep in mind.

  • Who do you want to reach?  Answering this question will help determine where you advertise and your advertising message.  You want to think of where your potential customers get their information and why they may need your product or service.
  • Have a consistent image and message that will appeal to your target market.  You can have ads that address different topics, but the look of your ad and the basic message about your company should remain consistent so that your ad is instantly recognizable as being from your company.
  • Once is not enough.  Repetition is essential to get through the information clutter, so you will have to set aside a decent advertising budget to get the results you want.
  • Monitor your campaign’s effectiveness.  The simplest way to do this is to regularly ask where any new contact heard about you.

Posted by Margot Dimond

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Trade Show Success Starts with the Right Strategy

Trade Shows are a major part of marketing for many businesses, but generating solid leads requires a plan.  Guest blogger, Wendy Marx of Marx Communications, shows how the right strategy can make all the difference.

Sadly, getting leads is no slam dunk and not every lead you get is a hot one. You need to have the right audience, right message, right time — and the right strategy.

When it comes to trade shows, you might think that generating B2B leads is a piece of cake. After all, you’re under one roof, engaging with those who have an active interest in your industry, often for multiple days.

And, although LinkedIn is responsible for generating as many as 80% of all B2B leads, trade shows are still a successful staple of any B2B marketing strategy.

77% of marketers say trade shows generate a significant quantity of leads. ~ Tom Pick of Meltwater

So how can you make the most of your trade show experience?

5 WAYS TO GENERATE B2B LEADS AT TRADE SHOWS

1.  Contact the Right People Weeks Before.  Typically, a trade show will release a list of press members who are covering the show. This may include bloggers, influencers, and journalists.

While these contacts are not themselves leads, their audience is. One of the most important steps you can take to snag time with these influential people is to reach out to them by email at least several weeks before a show. Request that they stop by your booth, and if possible, schedule a time for them to do so. Remember that media get jammed at trade shows so you want to be early enough for them to see you. If they are overscheduled or not attending the conference, not to worry. Offer them the opportunity to interview you in advance and embargo the interview till the show.

If you can, give them samples, a free trial, or a demo of your product or service.  And don’t forget to provide background information or any helpful collateral.

2.  Land a Speaking Engagement.  Securing a speaking gig is a great way to generate more credibility around your brand, as well as yourself as a thought leader.

This isn’t always easy to do, so you must plan well in advance. Thought leadership begins with your owned media. In addition, once you have established credibility, you will have to submit an application to speak, likely months in advance. Here’s one tip to help get you in the door: Submit if you can with a customer. Trade shows are loaded with vendors eager to speak and you can differentiate yourself by presenting with a customer.

Landing a speaking engagement at a trade show is well worth the effort, as it will drive prospects, not only to your booth, but to your website since you will (with any luck) create a memorable presence.

3.  Establish Your Goals.  Of course, the end game is always to turn strangers into buyers. However, the stage you’re at in your marketing game will largely determine your goals and means of achieving them.

If you’re a startup, you’re main mission at a trade show might be to create a buzz by handing out free swag. However, if you’re well-established, you might be aiming to launch a new product, or secure greater publicity.

Get your strategy in place by first determining your end game.

4.  Get Busy on Social Media.  In the weeks and days that precede a trade event, you’ll want to create a buzz on social media. If your brand is launching a new product at a trade show, why not use Snapchat to reveal a hint of the product, mentioning that the full product will be unleashed at the upcoming trade show.

While you’re at the trade show, take full advantage of Facebook Live to capture real-time highlights of the event.

5.  Follow Up.  Want to know something a bit frightening? One statistic says:

“90% of trade show attendees received no follow-up within 12 months of their visit.” ~ Danny Zecevic of Skura

If you want anything to come of your trade show experience, you must follow up. That means inputting new contacts into your CRM, reaching out via email or telephone, and asking for permission to add them to your email list.

Just think… if you can accomplish this one task that so few B2B companies are paying attention to, you’ll have the upper hand to win your prospects’ attention.

Ready to go conquer your next trade show? Just remember…

  • Make contact with the press well before the show.
  • Land a speaking engagement.
  • Create and work within your trade show marketing strategy.
  • Publicize your presence at the event on social media.
  • Always follow up with the contacts you made at the show. 

Wendy Marx is president of Marx Communications, which is based in Connecticut.

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PR and the Rise of Digital News

Anyone who has observed the media for the past decade has seen a dramatic change in the way news is reported and disseminated.  For the most part, this is due to the rise of digital as the preferred way for Americans to get their news.

According to a recent study by the Pew Research Center, “digital is currently second only to TV news as the most prominent news platform.”

The study was published by Pew in an article on its website, “10 facts about the changing digital news landscape.”  Fact #5 stands out for PR practitioners:   “Social media, particularly Facebook, is now a common news source.”

How does this affect the practice of PR?

Advertising dollars are spent where most people will see the ads, and that is increasingly online.  Advertising pays the bills.  As more advertising money is spent online, many traditional newsrooms are cutting back on staff – not just at newspapers, but at radio and television stations as well.

What this means is that PR people can face stiff competition when attempting to get positive media attention for their clients through traditional media outlets.  That’s usually not a problem for experienced practitioners.  However, it’s important to consider that the audience they are trying to reach may be getting their news somewhere else.

This is basic strategic public relations:  analyze the client’s target audiences and where and how these audiences can most likely be reached.

Nowadays, that may be online.

Posted by Margot Dimond

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Forming a Productive Relationship with Your PR Firm

Branding Brand Trademark Commercial Identity Marketing ConceptMost public relations firms that have been in business for a while have established relationships with long-term clients.  That’s no accident.  Lasting client/PR firm relationships are built on mutual trust and respect.  The client knows that the PR firm has its best interests at heart, will keep confidential information confidential, and can design and communicate strategic messages effectively.  The PR firm appreciates being part of the team – respected for its contribution to the organization.

How that relationship begins is the key to its success. Every PR firm has a responsibility upfront to explain their process for coming up with a strategy and implementing it, especially for a business or nonprofit organization that has never worked with a PR firm before.  Successful PR-client relationships begin with an understanding of what PR can do and how it can achieve the organization’s goals.

The client also has some responsibility for making the relationship a mutually beneficial one.  Here are three tips for clients who want to establish a positive, long-term relationship with their PR firm:

  • Let them show what they can do. Bring the PR firm in at the beginning of the relationship to inform them of your business goals so they can develop an effective communication strategy to achieve them. Expecting a PR firm to handle a series of communication tactics – news releases, brochures, ads – without allowing them to design the strategy behind them rarely works out well.  An outside PR counselor is trained to look for the “WIIFM” factor – the news significance or marketing message that you may not see as an insider.
  • Communicate. It may take some time to develop trust with a new PR firm, but if a firm has been in business for several years and has a good reputation and established long-term client relationships, that firm is probably trustworthy.  So share as much information as possible about your business, its successes and its failures. PR firms specialize in finding solutions to problems. Give them a chance to do so.
  • Be responsive. Too many great PR plans have been thrown off track by a client’s delayed response to a PR firm.  Timeliness in response to events, news, or a media interview request can mean the difference between gaining positive attention for your organization and missing out on a really great opportunity.

Posted by Margot Dimond.

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Is your marketing plan stuck in neutral?

PuzzleIt’s often said that doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result is the definition of insanity. In actuality, it’s probably just the definition of being human. Let’s face it: Sometimes we get stuck in a rut – doing things the same way for years and wondering why the outcome isn’t better.

It’s not all that different with a business. Often a consulting firm is called in to make recommendations for improving marketing results, and its suggestions are met with resistance because they are out of the company’s comfort zone.

But leaving your comfort zone is exactly what has to happen to move forward and see some results.

It’s planning time again – time to look at the approaching New Year and make decisions on what you want to see happening with your business in 2016.

How about taking a look at the latest marketing trends to see if any will be suited for you? Or better yet, contact a PR/marketing firm and ask them to conduct a complete audit of your marketing program and design a new plan for you based on their findings.

Just remember to follow through on implementing the plan. After all, if it’s not implemented, you will never know how well it worked.

Posted by Margot Dimond

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The WII-FM factor: Do you know who your audience is?

Confusion2015 is now halfway over. How is your marketing program going so far? Are the people you are trying to reach – your audience – responding to your efforts to reach them?

The WII-FM factor, or “What’s in it for me,” is about the importance of communicating to your audience from their point-of-view.   If you are having difficulty reaching your audience, perhaps you haven’t correctly identified who they are and what they are interested in.

Spending time upfront identifying your audience is essential in deciding the best method of communication, as Lisa Dimond Vasquez explains here.homescreen_edited-1

 

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New PR Tools Prove Effective

social-toolboxTo many business people, public relations is still defined in terms of the “news release,” but it’s always been more than that.  It’s about creating and managing the reputation of a company or nonprofit organization through a well-defined communications strategy.  The news release is just one communication tool, and many new ones are being incorporated into the discipline every day.

Here are some things to think about for your next marketing campaign:

  • The Rise of Visual Content.  In recent surveys by PR tech firms Cision and Isebox, nearly two-thirds of journalists said they want press releases to give them easy access to photos, videos and graphics.  That makes sense when you consider that YouTube is the second most-visited social website after Facebook and infographics and other graphic representations are becoming ever more prevalent in communications.
  • Customized Messaging.  Customizing messaging for different audiences has always been an essential part of promoting your company and its products or services.  But it’s increasingly important today as audiences become fragmented by interest.  People now have access to a wide range of information, and they choose what kind of information they want and how they want to receive it like never before.
  • Native Advertising.  Digital media has given rise to a growing trend:  advertisements that are in the same format as the content audiences are there to consume.  They have proven to be more effective in generating click rates than traditional banner ads.
  • Inbound Marketing.  Inbound marketing is the process of drawing the right people to you – the people who are already interested in the topic you are addressing – through providing quality content on your website, blog, newsletter or social media platforms.  The key to producing good content requires not only good ideas but the ability to write about them in a compelling way.
  • E-Mail News Blasts.  Your employees can be your greatest sales force, but your internal audience is composed of more than employees.  Current clients, business partners, members of organizations you belong to, volunteers and donors (if you have a nonprofit organization) – it’s important to regularly stay in touch with all of them.  And e-mail has made it easier than ever.  After a lull during which businesses flirted with various social media platforms, e-blasts and e-mail newsletters are back in style.  Less expensive and time-consuming than printed publications (and more likely to be read), e-blasts can be sent with the latest news literally in the same day.

Posted by Margot Dimond

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Up Your Game for 2015

on his wayThe first month of 2015 is almost over, but it’s not too late to think about doing a better job of marketing your business this year. Here are five things that will make your efforts more productive.

1.  Do a strategic plan – and follow it. Take a fresh look at your last PR/marketing plan. Is it kind of dusty? Let’s face it, many plans are. Typically, a firm will host an end-of-year planning session, maybe at a retreat where the staff discusses goals for the year, strategies, marketing objectives, etc. Finally, someone is assigned to put all of the ideas into a written plan.  When finished, it’s passed around, and everyone feels good about having done it. But during the year, ideas get thrown around and tried out without any regard for the plan. How do we know a plan works if it isn’t put it into practice?

2.  Effectively incorporate social media into your marketing plan. The key word here is “effectively.” When it comes to social media marketing, there are two types of staff members: evangelists, who think it’s the answer to everything; and followers, who think social media marketing is complicated and should be left to the evangelists to implement. Our take? Social media is an important part of the overall marketing strategy when it fulfills the stated objectives, and since it involves communication, the public relations department should direct its strategy and implementation.

3.  Whether in traditional or new marketing, quality content trumps all. Keep in mind that everyone listens to the same radio station: WII-FM, or “What’s in it for me.” If your content – whether in a speech, article, or online – speaks to your audience from their point-of-view, you will be successful. If your communication is all about your firm and what you do, instead of about your audience and what you can do for them, you will struggle to succeed.

4.  Review your social media platforms. Video was 66% of internet traffic in 2013; by 2018, it is estimated to be 84%. Internet traffic draws people to your website, so you really can’t ignore online video. And you don’t have to hire a video crew and have an expensive production. Just start videotaping. With all of the new equipment around, you can make quick promotional or education videos and use an editing program to turn them into something people will want to watch.

5.  Print is not dead, but… As more publications publish digital editions, more people are comfortable getting their news that way. In fact, according to a Pew Research Center study, by 2012 more Americans got their news online than from radio or newspapers. That said, many people think that ads or articles are less likely to be seen if they are exclusively in the digital edition of a publication.  But keep in mind that your digitally published article or ad can be linked to and sent around the world.

Posted by Margot Dimond

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Don’t Do a Marketing Program – Until You Can Answer These Questions

Maze 3Anyone who has ever been trapped in a traffic jam while desperately trying to get somewhere on time knows how confusing side streets can be.  Turning onto one to find a fast way to get out of the jam can bring you right back to where you originally went off the main highway.

It can be the same with marketing a business: A business owner can rush into the latest and greatest marketing idea, only to find that he or she has spent a lot of money going nowhere.  He hasn’t really moved the target market to buy his product or service.

Promoting a business today can be a maze of confusing options:  Besides traditional public relations, advertising and direct mail, a plethora of marketing options have been presented by Social Media, Inbound Marketing, Mobile Marketing, Content Marketing, LinkedIn, Google Plus, Twitter TV, YouTube, Pinterest, Instagram, Paid Social Media and SEO.  And new possibilities keep arising every day.  It can be hard to keep up – even for seasoned marketers.

But there are some essentials to keep in mind when doing a marketing plan – and they never change.  Before committing to any long-term program, ask yourself these questions:

1.  What are you trying to sell?  Whether you are in a service business or producing a product, you are, after all, trying to sell something.  Be very clear about what that is.

2.  Who are the people likely to be interested in buying what you are selling? This is a question that should be easy to answer, since you probably fashioned your product or service around a perceived need in the first place.

3.  Where are these people likely to congregate?  What do they read or view, what organizations do they belong to, what are their buying habits?

Now you are ready to do some research on the different marketing options.  For instance, if you are selling a service to a high-income group, you will have a different set of choices than if you own a boutique clothing store.  In the latter case, you really want to be out there, with heavy SEO and Social Media Marketing.  If you are appealing to CEOs of major companies – not so much.

The point is not to start down the street until you know in what direction you should be headed.  And yes, all of this takes time upfront, but it can really pay off in long-term results.

Posted by Margot Dimond

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WHAT’S YOUR “WIIFM” MESSAGE?

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Yes, but what’s in it for me?

By now, most business executives have heard of the “WIIFM” factor. If not, let’s specify that WIIFM is not a radio station; it’s a shortcut for “What’s in it for me” – the secret to all successful marketing.

When a new technology comes out, people aren’t as interested in hearing about the speed, design or internal workings of the product as they are about what it can do for them – how they can use it and how it will make their lives better, easier, or more efficient.

However, too often product marketers forget this, focusing on their product’s features rather than the buyers – their audience – and how it may fulfill their needs.   That’s a formula for failure.

It’s that way with all selling. Whether selling a product or service, it’s essential to consider the audience and how that product or service will benefit them.

Sales professionals know this. They usually spend a considerable amount of time profiling their audience to gauge what their needs are before they launch into a sales pitch. That way they have a better chance of having an attentive audience.

Keeping the WIIFM factor in mind, here are some guidelines for a more successful sales presentation:

  • Do some background research. Find out as much as you can about the person or company who will be the audience for your presentation, to determine their interests and needs.
  • Concentrate on your audience. At your first meeting, ask some questions to see what their current goals are and what challenges they face in achieving them.
  • Present your elevator message. Give a very brief introduction to your company and your product or service.
  • Present the benefits of buying from you. Using what you have learned from your research and conversation, present clearly and concisely the benefits of your product or service to your audience and how it can address their particular needs.

Of course, using the WIIFM factor does not guarantee success, but it can go a long way toward achieving it.

Posted by Margot Dimond

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