Writing your way to thought leadership: Five Tips

The concept of thought leadership is not new.  In fact, it has been around for years – especially in professional services firms where reputations rest on demonstrating expertise.

It’s still a viable concept, however. As the go-to experts for information, guidance, ideas and inspiration, thought leaders attain national prominence as leaders in their field.

But being recognized as a thought leader does not happen overnight.  It’s a step-by-step process.  If you would like to become a thought leader in your field, one of the best ways is to take some of the ideas and concepts that you have found helpful in your career and turn them into articles to submit to publications that can establish you as a credible industry expert.

Here are some tips to help you on your way to becoming a published thought leader:

  1. Have something to say.  Your article should be relevant to today’s business issues, regardless of the industry you represent.  It should contribute to the current conversation and predict trends for the future.  Finally, it should inspire others to implement your ideas.
  2. Speak to your target audience.  Especially in trade publications, your article should address industry-specific challenges and issues.  And don’t forget that every publication has its editorial requirements; you should be familiar with them before writing your article.
  3. Present your ideas in an engaging way.  Even when you are seeking to be published in a magazine serving your industry, you will need to write your article for readers who, while intelligent, are probably not as steeped in your subject as you are.  Write clearly in a conversational tone and avoid technical jargon.
  4. Do not openly promote yourself or your business in your article.    Recognition is a funny thing.  Sometimes the harder you try to get recognized, the less successful you are.  Demonstrate your expertise through recognizing others’ work in your pieces and jumping off from what they say to talk about your ideas.  You and your company will be identified at the end of the article.
  5. Remember that getting recognized takes time.  Persistence can pay off.  Get published as often as you can – guest opinion pieces in publications or blogs serving your industry can lead to business publications and gradually more mainstream media attention. And by all means, get help from a professional writer if you need it.  You will save time and money in the long run.

Posted by Margot Dimond

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Growing your audience with a center of influence PR strategy

The following post is by Hollie Geitner, Vice President for Client Services at WordWrite Communications of Pittsburgh.  WordWrite is a fellow member agency – with Houston’s DoubleDimond Public Relations – of PR Boutiques International.

HubSpot’s 2018 State of Inbound report found that 63% of companies view generating traffic and leads as their biggest marketing challenge.

Many of our clients and those we talk to regularly have expressed similar frustrations, asking:  “How do I connect with my target audience when there is so much noise out there?”

It’s a reasonable question.  Traditional advertising is less effective than it once was, attention spans are shorter than ever, and newsrooms are shrinking by the day.

Perhaps it’s time to consider an alternative – communicating with your center of influence (COI), or those who directly impact the decisions of your end-users/end-buyers.  In many cases, those are people or organizations you’ve been aware of but haven’t really invested the time or resources into just yet.  These folks are actively looking for viable options for their clients (your ideal customers) and the sooner you make those influencers a priority, the sooner you may see results.

Consider builders or contractors who work closely with realtors, financial advisors who market to attorneys and accountants, manufacturers of safety products who communicate with risk management consultants…

In most cases, this narrow COI audience is trusted by those who ultimately purchase or use your product or service.  They are a good referral network, and in ideal scenarios, you might be able to do the same for them, making it a beneficial relationship for all.  In working with these groups, the key is not to sell, but to educate and inform.  Offer something that helps them solve their clients’ unique challenges.

Identifying your COIs is only the first step, however.  Just like your customers, you have to understand how the COIs operate, what they read, how they consume information and how they work with their own clients.  Your outreach strategy might include social, digital and traditional marketing and your messaging will speak directly to them.  You’ll need to tweak your customer messaging a bit, but it is well worth the effort.

The COI strategy is particularly helpful today as social media allows for highly targeted advertising focused on interests, key words, geographic location and industries served.

If you feel you’ve hit a plateau in your marketing efforts, it may be time to rethink your strategy and focus on your own COI network.

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Search Engine Marketing: SEO vs. PPC

Having a strong online presence is essential in today’s business environment. Search Engine Optimization (SEO) and Pay-Per-Click (PPC) are the two most utilized methods of Search Engine Marketing, but how do they work – and which is best for your business?

First, the definitions: SEO is basically a series of techniques, strategies and tactics used by a webmaster to drive traffic to your website organically from search engines. PPC is an advertising model used to direct online traffic to websites, in which the advertiser pays whenever someone clicks on their ad.   Choosing the right keywords – words and phrases that are part of your web profile – is important to the success of both SEO and PPC.

When deciding which option will provide the best return on investment for your business, you may want to keep the following three things in mind: Cost, Credibility, and Commitment.

  • Cost:  SEO is very labor intensive and usually takes some time to show results, so the costs can be daunting, depending on what you need and who you are competing with. If you are the new kid on the block in a crowded marketplace, it’s going to be an uphill battle to get on that coveted first page. PPC, on the other hand, can give you a much bigger bang for the buck.  With paid search ads, you can set your own budget and adjust it as needed all along the way. In addition, paid search ads usually appear on the first page above the organic search results, so the user will always see them, even if they scroll past them.  Advantage: PPC.
  • Credibility:  PPC and SEO are related to the more traditional marketing tactics of display advertising and earned media coverage (publicity). Paid advertising is easily measured for ROI, and done well can have really positive results. Also, advertising can bring the kind of immediate attention that will influence your organic search results in the long run. On the other hand, SEO is related to earned media coverage, which implies a third-party endorsement by the media outlet that publishes it. Similarly, organic search results indicate that Google or Bing has endorsed your business as worth paying attention to.  Advantage: SEO.
  • Commitment: Both SEO and PPC require a level of commitment to work well. SEO, however, can take a long time and require a great deal of content development to keep it going – new blog posts, new product offers, etc. With PPC, you can tell fairly quickly if your ads or keywords are resulting in increased traffic and what the visitors to your site are doing when they get there by using Google Analytics. You can then make adjustments as required. However, unlike PPC, SEO offers sustainability; it does not cease when you stop paying.  Advantage: A Tossup.
  • Combination: Choosing an online traffic driver doesn’t have to be an either-or decision; it’s really best to use a combination of both SEO and PPC, budget permitting. That way, you get the best of both – as long as you have an overall strategy for implementation, which is essential for both short- and long-term success.

Posted by Margot Dimond

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Planning to Advertise? Four Things to Keep in Mind

Many potential clients approach a public relations firm seeking earned media coverage (aka “free publicity”) to promote their product or service.  Depending on the client, their target market and goals, a PR firm may recommend including advertising in the marketing mix to achieve maximum effectiveness.

We believe having a professionally planned ad campaign is the best way to proceed, but if you decide to do it on your own, here are a few guidelines to keep in mind.

  • Who do you want to reach?  Answering this question will help determine where you advertise and your advertising message.  You want to think of where your potential customers get their information and why they may need your product or service.
  • Have a consistent image and message that will appeal to your target market.  You can have ads that address different topics, but the look of your ad and the basic message about your company should remain consistent so that your ad is instantly recognizable as being from your company.
  • Once is not enough.  Repetition is essential to get through the information clutter, so you will have to set aside a decent advertising budget to get the results you want.
  • Monitor your campaign’s effectiveness.  The simplest way to do this is to regularly ask where any new contact heard about you.

Posted by Margot Dimond

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Trade Show Success Starts with the Right Strategy

Trade Shows are a major part of marketing for many businesses, but generating solid leads requires a plan.  Guest blogger, Wendy Marx of Marx Communications, shows how the right strategy can make all the difference.

Sadly, getting leads is no slam dunk and not every lead you get is a hot one. You need to have the right audience, right message, right time — and the right strategy.

When it comes to trade shows, you might think that generating B2B leads is a piece of cake. After all, you’re under one roof, engaging with those who have an active interest in your industry, often for multiple days.

And, although LinkedIn is responsible for generating as many as 80% of all B2B leads, trade shows are still a successful staple of any B2B marketing strategy.

77% of marketers say trade shows generate a significant quantity of leads. ~ Tom Pick of Meltwater

So how can you make the most of your trade show experience?

5 WAYS TO GENERATE B2B LEADS AT TRADE SHOWS

1.  Contact the Right People Weeks Before.  Typically, a trade show will release a list of press members who are covering the show. This may include bloggers, influencers, and journalists.

While these contacts are not themselves leads, their audience is. One of the most important steps you can take to snag time with these influential people is to reach out to them by email at least several weeks before a show. Request that they stop by your booth, and if possible, schedule a time for them to do so. Remember that media get jammed at trade shows so you want to be early enough for them to see you. If they are overscheduled or not attending the conference, not to worry. Offer them the opportunity to interview you in advance and embargo the interview till the show.

If you can, give them samples, a free trial, or a demo of your product or service.  And don’t forget to provide background information or any helpful collateral.

2.  Land a Speaking Engagement.  Securing a speaking gig is a great way to generate more credibility around your brand, as well as yourself as a thought leader.

This isn’t always easy to do, so you must plan well in advance. Thought leadership begins with your owned media. In addition, once you have established credibility, you will have to submit an application to speak, likely months in advance. Here’s one tip to help get you in the door: Submit if you can with a customer. Trade shows are loaded with vendors eager to speak and you can differentiate yourself by presenting with a customer.

Landing a speaking engagement at a trade show is well worth the effort, as it will drive prospects, not only to your booth, but to your website since you will (with any luck) create a memorable presence.

3.  Establish Your Goals.  Of course, the end game is always to turn strangers into buyers. However, the stage you’re at in your marketing game will largely determine your goals and means of achieving them.

If you’re a startup, you’re main mission at a trade show might be to create a buzz by handing out free swag. However, if you’re well-established, you might be aiming to launch a new product, or secure greater publicity.

Get your strategy in place by first determining your end game.

4.  Get Busy on Social Media.  In the weeks and days that precede a trade event, you’ll want to create a buzz on social media. If your brand is launching a new product at a trade show, why not use Snapchat to reveal a hint of the product, mentioning that the full product will be unleashed at the upcoming trade show.

While you’re at the trade show, take full advantage of Facebook Live to capture real-time highlights of the event.

5.  Follow Up.  Want to know something a bit frightening? One statistic says:

“90% of trade show attendees received no follow-up within 12 months of their visit.” ~ Danny Zecevic of Skura

If you want anything to come of your trade show experience, you must follow up. That means inputting new contacts into your CRM, reaching out via email or telephone, and asking for permission to add them to your email list.

Just think… if you can accomplish this one task that so few B2B companies are paying attention to, you’ll have the upper hand to win your prospects’ attention.

Ready to go conquer your next trade show? Just remember…

  • Make contact with the press well before the show.
  • Land a speaking engagement.
  • Create and work within your trade show marketing strategy.
  • Publicize your presence at the event on social media.
  • Always follow up with the contacts you made at the show. 

Wendy Marx is president of Marx Communications, which is based in Connecticut.

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PR and the Rise of Digital News

Anyone who has observed the media for the past decade has seen a dramatic change in the way news is reported and disseminated.  For the most part, this is due to the rise of digital as the preferred way for Americans to get their news.

According to a recent study by the Pew Research Center, “digital is currently second only to TV news as the most prominent news platform.”

The study was published by Pew in an article on its website, “10 facts about the changing digital news landscape.”  Fact #5 stands out for PR practitioners:   “Social media, particularly Facebook, is now a common news source.”

How does this affect the practice of PR?

Advertising dollars are spent where most people will see the ads, and that is increasingly online.  Advertising pays the bills.  As more advertising money is spent online, many traditional newsrooms are cutting back on staff – not just at newspapers, but at radio and television stations as well.

What this means is that PR people can face stiff competition when attempting to get positive media attention for their clients through traditional media outlets.  That’s usually not a problem for experienced practitioners.  However, it’s important to consider that the audience they are trying to reach may be getting their news somewhere else.

This is basic strategic public relations:  analyze the client’s target audiences and where and how these audiences can most likely be reached.

Nowadays, that may be online.

Posted by Margot Dimond

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Forming a Productive Relationship with Your PR Firm

Branding Brand Trademark Commercial Identity Marketing ConceptMost public relations firms that have been in business for a while have established relationships with long-term clients.  That’s no accident.  Lasting client/PR firm relationships are built on mutual trust and respect.  The client knows that the PR firm has its best interests at heart, will keep confidential information confidential, and can design and communicate strategic messages effectively.  The PR firm appreciates being part of the team – respected for its contribution to the organization.

How that relationship begins is the key to its success. Every PR firm has a responsibility upfront to explain their process for coming up with a strategy and implementing it, especially for a business or nonprofit organization that has never worked with a PR firm before.  Successful PR-client relationships begin with an understanding of what PR can do and how it can achieve the organization’s goals.

The client also has some responsibility for making the relationship a mutually beneficial one.  Here are three tips for clients who want to establish a positive, long-term relationship with their PR firm:

  • Let them show what they can do. Bring the PR firm in at the beginning of the relationship to inform them of your business goals so they can develop an effective communication strategy to achieve them. Expecting a PR firm to handle a series of communication tactics – news releases, brochures, ads – without allowing them to design the strategy behind them rarely works out well.  An outside PR counselor is trained to look for the “WIIFM” factor – the news significance or marketing message that you may not see as an insider.
  • Communicate. It may take some time to develop trust with a new PR firm, but if a firm has been in business for several years and has a good reputation and established long-term client relationships, that firm is probably trustworthy.  So share as much information as possible about your business, its successes and its failures. PR firms specialize in finding solutions to problems. Give them a chance to do so.
  • Be responsive. Too many great PR plans have been thrown off track by a client’s delayed response to a PR firm.  Timeliness in response to events, news, or a media interview request can mean the difference between gaining positive attention for your organization and missing out on a really great opportunity.

Posted by Margot Dimond.

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Is your marketing plan stuck in neutral?

PuzzleIt’s often said that doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result is the definition of insanity. In actuality, it’s probably just the definition of being human. Let’s face it: Sometimes we get stuck in a rut – doing things the same way for years and wondering why the outcome isn’t better.

It’s not all that different with a business. Often a consulting firm is called in to make recommendations for improving marketing results, and its suggestions are met with resistance because they are out of the company’s comfort zone.

But leaving your comfort zone is exactly what has to happen to move forward and see some results.

It’s planning time again – time to look at the approaching New Year and make decisions on what you want to see happening with your business in 2016.

How about taking a look at the latest marketing trends to see if any will be suited for you? Or better yet, contact a PR/marketing firm and ask them to conduct a complete audit of your marketing program and design a new plan for you based on their findings.

Just remember to follow through on implementing the plan. After all, if it’s not implemented, you will never know how well it worked.

Posted by Margot Dimond

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The WII-FM factor: Do you know who your audience is?

Confusion2015 is now halfway over. How is your marketing program going so far? Are the people you are trying to reach – your audience – responding to your efforts to reach them?

The WII-FM factor, or “What’s in it for me,” is about the importance of communicating to your audience from their point-of-view.   If you are having difficulty reaching your audience, perhaps you haven’t correctly identified who they are and what they are interested in.

Spending time upfront identifying your audience is essential in deciding the best method of communication, as Lisa Dimond Vasquez explains here.homescreen_edited-1

 

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New PR Tools Prove Effective

social-toolboxTo many business people, public relations is still defined in terms of the “news release,” but it’s always been more than that.  It’s about creating and managing the reputation of a company or nonprofit organization through a well-defined communications strategy.  The news release is just one communication tool, and many new ones are being incorporated into the discipline every day.

Here are some things to think about for your next marketing campaign:

  • The Rise of Visual Content.  In recent surveys by PR tech firms Cision and Isebox, nearly two-thirds of journalists said they want press releases to give them easy access to photos, videos and graphics.  That makes sense when you consider that YouTube is the second most-visited social website after Facebook and infographics and other graphic representations are becoming ever more prevalent in communications.
  • Customized Messaging.  Customizing messaging for different audiences has always been an essential part of promoting your company and its products or services.  But it’s increasingly important today as audiences become fragmented by interest.  People now have access to a wide range of information, and they choose what kind of information they want and how they want to receive it like never before.
  • Native Advertising.  Digital media has given rise to a growing trend:  advertisements that are in the same format as the content audiences are there to consume.  They have proven to be more effective in generating click rates than traditional banner ads.
  • Inbound Marketing.  Inbound marketing is the process of drawing the right people to you – the people who are already interested in the topic you are addressing – through providing quality content on your website, blog, newsletter or social media platforms.  The key to producing good content requires not only good ideas but the ability to write about them in a compelling way.
  • E-Mail News Blasts.  Your employees can be your greatest sales force, but your internal audience is composed of more than employees.  Current clients, business partners, members of organizations you belong to, volunteers and donors (if you have a nonprofit organization) – it’s important to regularly stay in touch with all of them.  And e-mail has made it easier than ever.  After a lull during which businesses flirted with various social media platforms, e-blasts and e-mail newsletters are back in style.  Less expensive and time-consuming than printed publications (and more likely to be read), e-blasts can be sent with the latest news literally in the same day.

Posted by Margot Dimond

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