Your TV Interview: Make Every Word Count!

TV InterviewWhat is your media message?  In other words, what is the main thing you want your target audience to know about you or your organization?

Now – Can you say it in under 9 seconds? That’s about all the time you have in a typical TV interview sound bite.  So it’s important to make every word count.

Sound impossible?  Not if you practice.  Like most everything else, being good at media interviews is a skill that you acquire through training and practice.  And practice is especially important if you want to distill your company message into a usable sound bite.

One of the main challenges in being interviewed by the news media is learning how to tell your story in a clear and concise way.  You can complain that you aren’t given enough time to do your message justice, but you aren’t going to change the medium.  It is what it is, and if you want media coverage, you will have to adjust your communication style to be compatible with media time constructions.

Most television news shows are 30 minutes.  Take out commercial time, weather and sports, and the reporters don’t have much time at all to tell their audience the news of the day.  Brevity is essential.

So let’s say you are fortunate enough to have attracted the attention of the media, and a TV interview is scheduled.  This is your opportunity to get your message out to a large number of people at once.

You will be interviewed by a reporter (or in some cases, a camera operator), and he or she may have background information on you and your organization, but that’s not your audience.  Your audience is the person at home watching.  You must be able to clearly explain your point of view to that person – the one with very little background information – in 9 seconds or less.

You must make every word count.  And that takes practice.

Posted by Margot Dimond

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If it sounds like it’s too good to be true….

National PublicityPicture this:  You have a relatively new business – one that has received some positive publicity.  But nothing has prepared you for a call from a television production company that wants to feature you on a national television show.  Wow – What luck!

You haven’t heard of this program, but the producer drops the name of a famous broadcaster and indicates that he or she is affiliated with the program.  You are impressed.  The producer sets up an interview day and time for you because they have to see if you are a “good fit” for the program.  During the interview, you are told that you will be responsible for paying $20,000 in production fees to produce your feature story.  Apparently, being a “good fit” means being willing to pay.

This month, one of our clients received two of these calls.  Our client refers all calls from the news media to our office, and we check out the media outlets and reporters with which we are unfamiliar to see if they are legitimate and, if so, what kind of stories they do.

These callers gave us pause.  For one thing, they didn’t want to talk to the public relations person; they only wanted to talk to the CEO.  That’s a red flag.  Most reporters or producers do not object to having their interview requests screened by a public relations person.

Second, in each case, the “producer” said he wanted to interview the CEO to see if the company would qualify for their program.  This is nonsense.  By the time reporters call for an interview, they already are interested in doing a story.

After investigating, we discovered that these programs were “pay for play” schemes.  Pay for Play in the media has been around for quite some time, but never promoted in such an underhanded way.  Many magazines – especially trade magazines – will tell you upfront that if you buy an ad you can get editorial space as well.  The same goes for infomercials – those paid-for time slots that promote products in a talk show setting.  But only in the past few years have we seen this type of deceptive approach.

How do you tell Pay for Play from the real thing?  You should immediately get off the phone if:

1.  You have never heard of the program, while the person on the phone is insisting it’s a big deal.  If you’ve never heard of it, it either doesn’t exist or isn’t worth your time.

2.  The person calling wants to interview the business owner or top executive to see if they “qualify” or are a “good fit” for their program.

3.  The caller is insistent about talking only to the business owner or top executive.

Posted by Margot Dimond

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