Don’t let this happen to you!

In a recent Twitter campaign, McDonald’s sought to promote the fact that the chain bought fresh produce from farmers.  First came the #MeetTheFarmers hashtag on Twitter; later in the day, the company launched #McDStories to generate positive stories from consumers.  Almost immediately users began tweeting stories about food with worms, food poisoning, and other such appetizing fare.  The large number of negative tweets caused a flurry of press coverage, embarrassing the company.

McDonald’s is not alone in experiencing a social media disaster.  Australia’s Qantas, car-maker Honda, and clothier Kenneth Cole are just a few more examples of corporate social media marketing plans gone awry.

Social media offers a great new venue for widespread exposure – especially for companies selling to consumers.  But it’s a double-edged sword that can also offer an opportunity for widespread embarrassment – as disgruntled employees, disappointed customers or professional gripers vent their frustrations in a very public way.

Understandably, seeing campaigns such as McDonald’s fall apart may make a marketing executive shy away from using social media to promote his company’s products or services.  But this type of unintended consequence can be avoided by remembering two important things:

1.  Have a Strategy.  As with any other public relations/marketing tool, you should know why you are doing the campaign.  Does it advance your brand?  Is it a good fit with your marketing goals?  Does it reach the right people with the right kind of message?  All of these questions should be asked before any campaign – of any type – is launched.

2.  Be an Emergency Manager.  A big part of emergency management takes place before the crisis happens.  Good emergency managers think, “What’s the worst that could happen?”  If there is a good chance your brand could be hijacked and trashed, you may want to try something else.  Even if you can’t think of a worst case scenario, have a crisis plan ready for handling any negative fallout.

Finally, monitor your campaign on a regular basis, so you will know how it’s going, and be ready to spring into action if things go awry.

There are always risks when doing social media marketing, but if well-planned and monitored, it may be well worth it for your company.

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How will your company use social media?

Company social mediaI’m in charge of new business development for our firm, and my son, who does social media for a website design firm, says our company needs to be active on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.  I’m not so sure.  What do you think?

Social media marketing is a relatively new and exciting development in the world of public relations.  It offers a dynamic set of social networking tools – blogs, microblogs, social bookmarketing, media and content sharing sites – that can be used to promote your business.  What, if any, of these tools you will want to use depends on the kind of company you represent and your overall communication goals.

In a recent survey of its members, PR Boutiques International, an international network of boutique public relations firms, 44 percent of respondents cited the power of social media as the major trend impacting communications in 2012.  However, rather than predicting that social media will be the PR “magic bullet” for all clients, respondents viewed it as a tool that must be strategically integrated into the enterprise’s communication program.  (Full disclosure:  DoubleDimond is a member of PR Boutiques International.)

There are endless creative ways these resources can be used.  Just make sure you use them strategically and assign someone with the responsibility for managing the function.

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