Why did they use that quote?

Does this sound familiar?  You’ve created a new product, and you finally get a media interview to promote it.  This is your big opportunity to let the world know what you have to offer.  Finally, you think, your business will get recognized.

Except it doesn’t work out quite the way you thought it would.  The news person shows up for the interview, and you talk in great detail about your product.  You may even provide a tour of your company headquarters.  In fact, the reporter is there for over an hour, and you can’t wait to see the story.

But when you do, you are disappointed.  The story contains only two quotes from you – comments you don’t even remember saying.  But worse than that, the reporter didn’t seem to understand the importance of your breakthrough product.

Maybe that’s because you never told him.  Sometimes it’s not good to know too much; it can keep you from explaining things clearly and concisely.

Remember:  The reporter is not your audience; the reporter’s audience is your audience. Tell them what your product (or service or invention) could mean to them – either now or in the future – in terms they can understand and relate to.

Do that, and you’ll be happier with the results.

 

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One thought on “Why did they use that quote?

  1. Good points! Had this happen to me and still don’t get why they used what they used but have since learned to keep it shorter.

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